Author Archives: Educational Policy Institute

About Educational Policy Institute

The Educational Policy Institute is a Washington, DC-based research think tank on education and the social sciences. EPI conducts evaluation and policy studies on various educational issues from Pre-K to workforce outcomes in the United States, Canada, and beyond. Visit us at educationalpolicy.org.

A Degree in Three Revisited

by Stephen Joel Trachtenberg, President Emeritis, The George Washington University, and Gerald B. Kauvar, Research Professor of public policy and public administration, The George Washington University Because of increased financial constraints on all State supported and most independent colleges and universities … Continue reading

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The ROI on Higher Education

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International There is much press and study about the returns to a higher education. I, myself, have developed and published charts and essays on the power of a postsecondary credential. … Continue reading

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Way Too Much!

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International An article in today’s The Chronicle of Higher Education, “Hey, Students, Your Education Costs More Than You Might Think,” discusses how Hamilton College’s cost per student is over $63,000. … Continue reading

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Indiana’s Higher Education Plan to Save the World

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International This morning, InsideHigherEd.com reported on Indiana’s plan to double the number of college degrees by 2025, from 60,000 to 120,000. Indiana, led by Governor Mitch Daniels (George W. Bush’s … Continue reading

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The “Not-So-Common” Common App

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International For students who are planning on going to college or university, a major complaint is the complexity of the application process. Beyond being academically prepared, going to college requires … Continue reading

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Free Tuition? Really?

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International As we continue to hear more about free or cheap university programs through MIT and other players, news comes from the province of Alberta of the Liberal party’s platform … Continue reading

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Can We Trust Colleges and Universities?

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International Last week, I discussed the President’s proposal for cost cutting and keeping colleges on task and on budget. Yesterday, the Senate held a hearing on college affordability that basically … Continue reading

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Aiming High: The Keeping College Affordable Initiative

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International This morning, President Obama used the setting of staff and students at the University of Michigan to unveil his Keeping College Affordable initiative. Based on his State of the … Continue reading

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Higher Education for Free – Part II

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International Before the Christmas break, I wrote a piece called “Higher Education for Free” (December 23, 2011). This week I am providing a “Part Deux” due to emerging news and … Continue reading

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Why are our College Graduates Unemployed?

By Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute/EPI International Tony Carnevale, Ban Cheah, and Jeff Strohl’s new publication: HardTimes: College Majors, Unemployment and Earnings, states that unemployment for new BA graduates is “an unacceptable 8.9 percent,” acknowledging that … Continue reading

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